1. "You Don't Own Me" PSA - Upworthy

  2. My version of @debbiehoesly Mexican soup.  Made for our visit to see little Anker. #mealtrain #newparentsneeddinner

    My version of @debbiehoesly Mexican soup. Made for our visit to see little Anker. #mealtrain #newparentsneeddinner

  3. guardian:

    US colleges are paying their presidents like CEOs and treating students like customers, using their tuition to foot the bill.

    It’s a broken system.

    gifs via Jeremy Johnstone/Ivory Tower

    Reblogged from: superfluousverbosity
  4. Adventures in Learning
    Reblogged from: baebl
  5. Choosing Our Battles: Standing By the Communities We Seek to Challenge

    As oppressed people in general, but particularly as people of multiple oppressions, we make constant decisions about which battles we are willing to fight, and what the potential outcomes might be: Do we call our friends out for using the misogynistic language that everyone in our hood uses? Do we come out to coworkers and risk losing a job? Do we send our kids to a better-resourced school if it means they will be the only Brown students in their class? Do we brave the violence of home if it means being around people who speak our languages, know how to dance our music, and understand our humor? Every day we find personal answers to these kinds of questions, and make choices about which struggles, big or small, we are prepared to take on within any given moment. To make these choices, sometimes deciding that we are not ready to fight a certain fight, is to take an active stance, not a passive one, as certain members of our communities who may not share all of our oppressions sometimes lead us to believe. Thinking actively about how we can participate in resistance in ways which protect and sustain us, is necessary for carrying on long term struggles for justice, and our duty to ourselves as members of those struggles. With that in mind, how do we make those choices actively? How do we choose our battles in ways which are healthy for ourselves, honoring of our communities, and still dangerous for the systems which do us harm?

    Reblogged from: cooperativecatalyst
  6. I believe we are on the cusp of a new season. It is time for Springtime in education. We are being called by our children and by the times, to coalesce a completely different vision. A vision that rises to meet the real needs of human life and all life on the planet now and into the future.
  7. ailedubooks:

I am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up For Education And Was Shot By The Taliban, by Christian Lamb and Malala Yousafzai
find here 
Summery:

When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education.On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive. Instead, Malala’s miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize.I AM MALALAis the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls’ education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons.I AM MALALAwill make you believe in the power of one person’s voice to inspire change in the world.

Worth Reading. Children can change the world. Also helps to show that education is not the same all over the world.

    ailedubooks:

    I am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up For Education And Was Shot By The Taliban, by Christian Lamb and Malala Yousafzai

    find here

    Summery:

    When the Taliban took control of the Swat Valley in Pakistan, one girl spoke out. Malala Yousafzai refused to be silenced and fought for her right to an education.

    On Tuesday, October 9, 2012, when she was fifteen, she almost paid the ultimate price. She was shot in the head at point-blank range while riding the bus home from school, and few expected her to survive.

    Instead, Malala’s miraculous recovery has taken her on an extraordinary journey from a remote valley in northern Pakistan to the halls of the United Nations in New York. At sixteen, she has become a global symbol of peaceful protest and the youngest nominee ever for the Nobel Peace Prize.

    I AM MALALAis the remarkable tale of a family uprooted by global terrorism, of the fight for girls’ education, of a father who, himself a school owner, championed and encouraged his daughter to write and attend school, and of brave parents who have a fierce love for their daughter in a society that prizes sons.

    I AM MALALAwill make you believe in the power of one person’s voice to inspire change in the world.

    Worth Reading. Children can change the world. Also helps to show that education is not the same all over the world.

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  8. illbegotdamn:

    darvinasafo:

    Jim Crow 2.0

    nothing’s changed. it’s just evolved.

    devil stay pulling tricks.

    Reblogged from: zwelinzima
  9. Drop That "Busy Work" Like It's Hot

    cooperativecatalyst:

    So here is the skinny on grading and assessment. I must first admit, it is something that we constantly have to work on in my building. Do the assignments that we ask our students to complete in our classrooms have a purpose? If the answer is no – then stop assigning them – like, now.

    There are several areas that we should focus on when bringing purposeful assessment to your building:

    Drop the Zero

    100-point grading scales are mathematically inaccurate – it is a fact. We must stop the use of the zero in our buildings immediately. The zero holds six times more weight than any other grade that we can assign students. Use of the zero in our grading practices could potentially eliminate a student’s chances of passing a course in the first semester. This is what I refer to as the Grading Abyss. It is a pitfall, that when students fall into it, they will act a fool in your class as they have no mathematical chance of passing your course – even with a 100%.

    Laws of Averaging State: 0% + 100% = 100%; when we divide that by 2, we get 50%. A failing grade. Bummer.

    Read more about dropping the use of the zero here.

    Are Your Grades Polluted?

    Do you know why we grade students? You should.

    Grades, at least at the middle and secondary levels, are about student proficiency with the standards that we teach. Anything else that we grade students on – other than proficiency on the standards – pollutes your grades. Say, if you grade students on participation (subjective) or behavior (subjective) – the grade becomes a reflection of much more than the student’s proficiency on the standards you are teaching. Parents when they see an A or a D on a progress report would not know whether the students are proficient on the standards, or are just a compliant student in your class.

    Your grades are polluted. You can read more about grading pollution here.

    Meaningful Feedback

    Grading for completion? C’mon… you know you’ve done it. I was guilty of it during my early years in the classroom.

    If we assign students work, we owe it to them to provide them with meaningful feedback. Checking (and assigning grades) for completion is nothing but “busy work”. Our students know that and they are on to us.

    What if we grade for completion, but a student actually doesn’t have a clue about what they are talking about. Hypothetically one could pass a student that knows nothing about the content area that we are teaching them in. Again, bummer. We would be guilty of contributing to just passing students on.

    If you assign work – provide your students with meaningful feedback.

    In schools across this country, we must tighten up our grading and assessment practices. The ability to assign grades comes with a lot of power. With great power, comes great responsibility.

    If we haphazardly assign grades and award credit without reason, we are going to produce students that are not proficient in any areas. On the other end, we are also failing hundreds of thousands of students every year based on what? This question is especially important when we reflect on the reasons for the 1.2 million high school dropouts that we encounter each year in the United States.

    So, I ask that as you begin the new school year that you look hard and redefine assessment in your classroom, schoolhouse, or district. Go forth and do great things.

    Reblogged from: cooperativecatalyst
  10. Marta’s #applefest tart. #jennsbirthday #perfect #solucky @littlemamalilly

    Marta’s #applefest tart. #jennsbirthday #perfect #solucky @littlemamalilly

  11. Halloween spider. #applefest #fall

    Halloween spider. #applefest #fall

  12. psychofactz:

 
    Reblogged from: psychofactz
  13. Balancing moods. 
Rocks pulled from my garden. #sundayart

    Balancing moods.
    Rocks pulled from my garden. #sundayart

  14. hisnamewasbeanni:

    wincherella:

    tunedintoteaching:

    mixedupdays:

    Today I needed something to get the kids excited, so my class bear disappeared again. He does this now and then and usually leaves a letter with hints as to his whereabouts, but this time I tried something a bit different. I came up with a sentence that had exactly 26 characters, then wrote out the sentence letter by letter on colorful cards. On the back of each card I wrote a name and a math problem to solve, tailored to that specific child’s ability level, with the answers in order from 1 to 26. Then I put the cards in a little clear box and set the box on the bear’s desk, with a “Do not open until after lunch” note.

    The kids were WILD to open that box! Once I did, I was just terribly confused about the cards inside…what could they mean? Well, they had names on them….the kids couldn’t wait to get their own card. Then we brainstormed. The first idea was that the cards were the alphabet and should go in order. So we tried this but almost immediately everyone realized that we were missing some letters and had doubles of others. That wasn’t it!

    Next, the students decided that the letters must make words, so we spent a few minutes trying to rearrange our letters. Some groups came up with several words but nothing that told us where the bear went. Hmmm.

    Just when I was about to hint that hey, there are MATH problems on the cards, maybe that had something to do with it, one student suddenly shrieked out that HIS math problem’s answer was 12, his friend’s was 13, and another friend’s was 14… quick everyone, solve your math problem!

    They were thrilled, just thrilled, when we got the letters in order by number and it made a sentence! Leo the bear was in the office! We marched down there and the kind secretaries returned him (apparently he had been most helpful all morning).

    Once we returned to the room, the students spent the rest of math time creating their own codes, and boy did some of them come up with some pretty complicated equations. This was so much fun, and just what I needed today…I was so pleased with their problem-solving, and I can’t wait to do it again with a different code!

    THIS IS GENUIS

    I want to do something like this with my kingdom groups.

    This…is effing adorable.

    And so damn cool.

    Reblogged from: hisnamewasbeanni
  15. Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like.’” A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level.

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