1. fuckyeahradicaled:

Text reads: When you look at the kind of schooling that’s all about superior results and “raising the bar,” you tend to find a variety of unwelcome consequences: less interest in learning for its own sake, less willingness to take on challenging tasks (since the point is to produce good results, not to take intellectual risks), more superficial thinking … and more cheating. -Alfie Kohn (Feel-Bad Education)

    fuckyeahradicaled:

    Text reads: When you look at the kind of schooling that’s all about superior results and “raising the bar,” you tend to find a variety of unwelcome consequences: less interest in learning for its own sake, less willingness to take on challenging tasks (since the point is to produce good results, not to take intellectual risks), more superficial thinking … and more cheating. -Alfie Kohn (Feel-Bad Education)

    Reblogged from: fuckyeahradicaled
  2. Touche!

    Touche!

    Reblogged from: from-student-to-teacher
  3. I asked my tumblr followers:

    What book should every teacher read?

    here are zwelinzima answers:

    In no order,

    1.) The Book of Learning and Forgetting, by Frank Smith, discusses social relevance and control

    In this thought-provoking book, Frank Smith explains how schools and educational authorities systematically obstruct the powerful inherent learning abilities of children, creating handicaps that often persist through life. The author eloquently contrasts a false and fabricated “official theory” that learning is work (used to justify the external control of teachers and students through excessive regulation and massive testing) with a correct but officially suppressed “classic view” that learning is a social process that can occur naturally and continually through collaborative activities. This book will be crucial reading in a time when national authorities continue to blame teachers and students for alleged failures in education. It will help educators and parents to combat sterile attitudes toward teaching and learning and prevent current practices from doing further harm.

    2.) Teaching as a Subversive Activity, by Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner, speaks, again—directly and eloquently—on liberating young minds (here is my recommendation again)

    “There is no way to help a learner to be disciplined, active, and thoroughly engaged unless he perceives a problem to be a problem or whatever is to-be-learned as worth learning, and unless he plays an active role in determining the process of solution.”
    Neil Postman, Teaching as a Subversive Activity

    3.) Walking on Water, by Derrick Jensen, has just awesome stories with terrific lessons about asking questions (Note: I also recommend this book highly)

    Walking on Water is a startling and provocative look at teaching, writing, creativity, and life by a writer increasingly recognized for his passionate and articulate critique of modern civilization. This time Derrick Jensen brings us into his classroom—whether college or maximum security prison—where he teaches writing. He reveals how schools perpetuate the great illusion that happiness lies outside of ourselves and that learning to please and submit to those in power makes us into lifelong clock-watchers. As a writing teacher Jensen guides his students out of the confines of traditional education to find their own voices, freedom, and creativity.

  4. salon:

    Ronald Reagan pretty much ruined everything for millennials.

    Reblogged from: baebl
  5. ailedubooks:

    What book should every Teacher read?

    @savytrufle said: Tested: One American School Struggles to Make the Grade by Linda Perlstein

    Summery:

    A “vivid, unpredictable, fair, balanced and … very entertaining” look at how education reforms have changed one typical American elementary school over the course of a year (Jay Mathews, The Washington Post)

    The pressure is on at schools across America. In recent years, reforms such as No Child Left Behind have created a new vision of education that emphasizes provable results, uniformity, and greater attention for floundering students. Schools are expected to behave more like businesses and are judged almost solely on the bottom line: test scores.

    To see if this world is producing better students, Linda Perlstein immersed herself in a suburban Maryland elementary school, once deemed a failure, that is now held up as an example of reform done right. Perlstein explores the rewards and costs of that transformation, and the resulting portrait—detailed, human, and truly thought-provoking—provides the first detailed view of how new education policies are modified by human realities. 

    Find it here

    Have not read this one, but adding it to my summer reading list. Love books that showcase a year in the life of schools.

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  6. Reblogged from: adventuresinlearning
  7. stillpointpianomethod:


Composed by Mozart at 7 or 8 years of age, recently identified in Austria.

Music as art.

Not sure what all those means… or sounds like….but it looks fun!

    stillpointpianomethod:

    Composed by Mozart at 7 or 8 years of age, recently identified in Austria.

    Music as art.

    Not sure what all those means… or sounds like….but it looks fun!

    Reblogged from: stillpointpianomethod
  8. Summmmmer nights!

    Summmmmer nights!

  9. adventuresinlearning:

    A Year at Mission Hill - Chapter 4: Love and Limits (by ayearatmissionhill)

    "Of the many poignant moments in Chapter 4 of A Year at Mission Hill, my favorite is of teacher Jada Brown sitting and rocking a student (1:50). The image, as well as the rest of this episode, helps to draw focus to the physical and socio-emotional needs of students in all schools. Sadly, these are the needs most often lost in the current conversation of how we can build the sorts of schools our students most sorely need.” -Zac Chase (How Can Schools Meet the Developmental Needs of Children?)

    Reblogged from: adventuresinlearning
  10. Cooperative Catalyst - Active Conversation

    Reblogged from: adventuresinlearning
  11. goodmorningteachera:

    Democratic Education is…

    Reblogged from: goodmorningteachera
  12. ailedubooks:

    blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

    Before There Was Mozart: The Story of Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-George

    Lesa Cline-Ransome

    Joseph Boulogne loved music. The singing of the birds, the beat of drums, the peal of church bells—and most of all, the soaring notes of his violin. But as the son of a white plantation owner and a black slave, newly arrived in France from the West Indies, what chance did Joseph have for success with his music? Here is the true story of an extraordinary boy who overcame the prejudices of his peers to become one of the finest classical musicians in all of Europe.

    Author’s Photo

    This lushly illustrated book by Lesa Cline-Ransome and James E. Ransome introduces us to a talented musician and an overlooked figure in black history.

    Wanted to share this book 

    Find it here

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  13. Fireworks

  14. adventuresinlearning:

Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice by Sam Chaltain
Great new book about two schools in Washington DC. One public school with a long tradition in DC and A brand new charter school just creating the foundation of a school community.
I highly recommend this book. It is an honest and profound story of the everyday success and struggles in a school. Also provides an insight in what can pragmatically be done help create positive change in our schools. I have worked with Sam Chaltain and believe he was one of the top voice in education transformation in the country!
-Adventures in Learning

    adventuresinlearning:

    Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice by Sam Chaltain

    Great new book about two schools in Washington DC. One public school with a long tradition in DC and A brand new charter school just creating the foundation of a school community.

    I highly recommend this book. It is an honest and profound story of the everyday success and struggles in a school. Also provides an insight in what can pragmatically be done help create positive change in our schools. I have worked with Sam Chaltain and believe he was one of the top voice in education transformation in the country!

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  15. Reblogged from: from-student-to-teacher
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