1. Cooperative Catalyst - Active Conversation

  2. How Democratic is your learning environment? | IDEA: Institute for Democratic Education in America

    What’s happening at your school? A snapshot evaluation

    This survey can be taken anonymously by students, teachers, staff, parents, and school administrators. It provides information to better understand what is happening in your school.

  3. Want to know what powerful learning looks like? Sign up for the IDEA Oregon Tour! Sign up here The tour will showcase 4 unique schools and programs in Eugene, Oregon May 1st-3rd.  Join me and other educators, parents and students from around the state and country.

    Want to know what powerful learning looks like? Sign up for the IDEA Oregon Tour! Sign up here The tour will showcase 4 unique schools and programs in Eugene, Oregon May 1st-3rd.  Join me and other educators, parents and students from around the state and country.

  4. Listening for the Wisdom of Young People: Charlie Kouns at TEDxKatuah (by TEDxTalks)

    I fully believe in the power of the voices of our young people to lead a transformation of education. Their voices are filled with hope, compassion, innocence and bold ideas. They have nothing to lose and everything to gain if we but listen.

     Like Imagining Learning on Facebook!

  5. Education is Everything- Winner OECD Video Competition 2012 (by rachitsbarak)

    "Education is Everything. It is what starts at your birth and doesn’t stop until your last breath"

  6. 50 Ways To Make Your School More Democratic

    1.  Invite 5 students to a faculty meeting

    2.  Eliminate staff and student bathrooms

    3.  Ask students to facilitate important school wide meetings

    4.  Start each day with a morning meeting and check in, and listen to each other. (How are you? How are you feeling today?)

    5.  Ask students to develop rubrics for judging “excellent” work

    6.  End courses/units with a culminating projects designed by students, about something that really matters to them

    7.  Have students read each other’s papers and comment on them, directly to each other

    8.  Get students to determine the homework policy (even in the early grades)

    9.  Charge students with deciding what goes up on the walls at school

    10.  Pass a “talking stick” during intense discussions so that everyone gets a chance to speak

    11.  Eat lunch with kids (or teachers) you rarely talk to

    12.  Ask students to attend parent/teacher conferences

    13.  Ask students to evaluate themselves prior to parent/teacher conferences

    14.  Ask students to run parent/teacher conferences

    15.  Have everyone practice “yes/and” more than “no/but” (because success is available to everyone!)

  7. Where We Stand | IDEA: Institute for Democratic Education in America

    Guiding Principle

    The principle that guides where IDEA stands on every issue is this: “IDEA believes in education by, for, and with young people and communities.” We believe that schools should be “public” in the sense that they’re owned by the community, whether they are governed by a school board or charter, or are privately run. To paraphrase Michelle Fine, we believe that rather than fixating on the school’s structure, it’s more useful to consider whether they are sites of exploitation, sites of struggle, or sites of possibility.

  8. humanscaleschools:

    Yaacov Hecht - What is democratic education? (by Robert Kruschel)

    Reblogged from: humanscaleschools
  9. (via IDEA Organizing | The Institute for Democratic Education in America)
Last day to apply to be an IDEA community organizer! I have been a community organizer for two years! It is an amazing opportunity to help transform education!
Don’t wait help change education and the world!
Click here to Apply

    (via IDEA Organizing | The Institute for Democratic Education in America)

    Last day to apply to be an IDEA community organizer! I have been a community organizer for two years! It is an amazing opportunity to help transform education!

    Don’t wait help change education and the world!

    Click here to Apply

  10. via (IDEA: The Institute for Democratic Education in America)
  11. humanscaleschools:

    Yaacov Hecht - What is democratic education? (by Robert Kruschel)

    Reblogged from: humanscaleschools
  12. Bringing Democracy to Education « Cooperative Catalyst

    What is democratic education?

    The Institute for Democratic Education in America (IDEA) defines democratic education as “learning that equips every human being to participate fully in a healthy democracy.” This definition excites me. It is brilliant in its simplicity, yet still profound. Before unfolding what the word “learning” means in that definition, I want to address democracy and public education since it affects most of the young people in the United States. In all public schools, democracy is taught, so wouldn’t that make them all democratic by IDEA’s definition? It’s important to note that while democracy is taught, students are not given an opportunity to authentically practice democracy. This means having the opportunity to make real decisions in a community with concrete outcomes–not voting in student council on recommendations that are then given to an adult authority figure to say yes or no to. As Shilpa Jain pointed out to me, “If we don’t experience democracy in our schools, how could we ever expect to end up with democracy in the ‘real’ world?”

    We must balance our intellectual and historical understanding of democracy with opportunities for practice and spaces to learn about the nuances that take place when you must collectively come to a decision that affects your entire community. Ira Shor was very clear in explaining to me that “Democracy is not a speech given by an official to reassure us that we live in a democracy. Democracy is an everyday practice.” Bill Ayers reiterated this point when he went on to express the importance of “learning from democracy, not about democracy” which reminds me of a great scene in a documentary called Democratic Schools. In the documentary students are learning about butterflies through a chalk diagram on the board when a butterfly flies by the window. One student stops paying attention and is consumed with watching the butterfly’s every motion. The teacher pulls the shade down, scolds the student and reminds her that they’re trying to learn about butterflies (not from them).

    Shilpa Jain says that it is hard to use the phrase “democratic education” because of how each of those words have become so corrupted and diluted from their true meanings. Sonia Nieto added that democratic education “means practicing what we preach. It means putting into effect all of those noble ideals of equality and fair play.” She continued with a challenge to “look seriously at the policies and practices we have in place and ask how those further or not a democratic vision. Do high stakes tests for example further the ideals of democracy? What about the curriculum?” Her answer to each question was “not currently.”

    After attending a democratic school and teaching high school and preschool in a democratic environment, I’ve come to settle on a personal definition of what democratic education is which unfolds the word “learner” in IDEA’s definition. I see democratic education as learning that is meaningful, relevant, joyous, engaging, and empowering. I see it as learning rooted in respect for children and young people who actively participate in their education journey. It is learning grounded in love and community. I’ve come to realize democratic education is more than any one learning environment, such as a school, and more than one feature, such as voting, but an approach to life and learning and an approach to interacting with all members of your community in a way that respects, honors, and listens authentically to each voice within it. For me, this is the practice of real democracy, which can manifest in many different ways based on you, your community, and your learning environment.

  13. What is Democratic Education?

    What is Democratic Education?

  14. IDEA community organizers are focused on building the critical connections needed to spur transformative change in the U.S. educational system.
IDEA has 26 organizers advancing democratic education across the country.

    IDEA community organizers are focused on building the critical connections needed to spur transformative change in the U.S. educational system.

    IDEA has 26 organizers advancing democratic education across the country.

  15. 5gratefulthings:

    I am grateful to all the change agents of the world!

    1. Grateful for being able to see William Ayers at U of O last night.

    2. Grateful to work and play with many amazing community working to make the world more sustainable, just and democratic.

    3. Grateful for mentor texts like Walk Out, Walk On and Active Hope, and Democratic Education: A Beginning of a Story.

    4. Grateful that my mom taught me to question everything.

    5. Grateful to grow up in a house that was full of books, learning and reading.

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: 5gratefulthings
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Adventures in Learning

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