1. I believe we are on the cusp of a new season. It is time for Springtime in education. We are being called by our children and by the times, to coalesce a completely different vision. A vision that rises to meet the real needs of human life and all life on the planet now and into the future.
  2. Drop That "Busy Work" Like It's Hot

    cooperativecatalyst:

    So here is the skinny on grading and assessment. I must first admit, it is something that we constantly have to work on in my building. Do the assignments that we ask our students to complete in our classrooms have a purpose? If the answer is no – then stop assigning them – like, now.

    There are several areas that we should focus on when bringing purposeful assessment to your building:

    Drop the Zero

    100-point grading scales are mathematically inaccurate – it is a fact. We must stop the use of the zero in our buildings immediately. The zero holds six times more weight than any other grade that we can assign students. Use of the zero in our grading practices could potentially eliminate a student’s chances of passing a course in the first semester. This is what I refer to as the Grading Abyss. It is a pitfall, that when students fall into it, they will act a fool in your class as they have no mathematical chance of passing your course – even with a 100%.

    Laws of Averaging State: 0% + 100% = 100%; when we divide that by 2, we get 50%. A failing grade. Bummer.

    Read more about dropping the use of the zero here.

    Are Your Grades Polluted?

    Do you know why we grade students? You should.

    Grades, at least at the middle and secondary levels, are about student proficiency with the standards that we teach. Anything else that we grade students on – other than proficiency on the standards – pollutes your grades. Say, if you grade students on participation (subjective) or behavior (subjective) – the grade becomes a reflection of much more than the student’s proficiency on the standards you are teaching. Parents when they see an A or a D on a progress report would not know whether the students are proficient on the standards, or are just a compliant student in your class.

    Your grades are polluted. You can read more about grading pollution here.

    Meaningful Feedback

    Grading for completion? C’mon… you know you’ve done it. I was guilty of it during my early years in the classroom.

    If we assign students work, we owe it to them to provide them with meaningful feedback. Checking (and assigning grades) for completion is nothing but “busy work”. Our students know that and they are on to us.

    What if we grade for completion, but a student actually doesn’t have a clue about what they are talking about. Hypothetically one could pass a student that knows nothing about the content area that we are teaching them in. Again, bummer. We would be guilty of contributing to just passing students on.

    If you assign work – provide your students with meaningful feedback.

    In schools across this country, we must tighten up our grading and assessment practices. The ability to assign grades comes with a lot of power. With great power, comes great responsibility.

    If we haphazardly assign grades and award credit without reason, we are going to produce students that are not proficient in any areas. On the other end, we are also failing hundreds of thousands of students every year based on what? This question is especially important when we reflect on the reasons for the 1.2 million high school dropouts that we encounter each year in the United States.

    So, I ask that as you begin the new school year that you look hard and redefine assessment in your classroom, schoolhouse, or district. Go forth and do great things.

    Reblogged from: cooperativecatalyst
  3. Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like.’” A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level.

  4. Ralph Tells a Story By Abby Hanlon

    Summery:

    Nothing ever happens to Ralph. So every day when it’s time to write stories, Ralph thinks really hard. He stares at his paper. He stares at the ceiling. But he has no stories! With the help of his classmates, Ralph realizes that a great story can be about something very little … and that maybe he really does have some stories to tell. Debut author/illustrator Abby Hanlon’s endearing text and charming watercolor and colored pencil illustrations prove that writing can be fun! This story works nicely with Lucy Calkins’ Writer’s Workshop model of teaching.

    Quite Brilliant. After reading this story today, my class was able to generate over 100 story ideas in their writing journals! Very funny with great drawing and very clever questions. It really helps students think about where stories come from, which is everywhere. Perfect for students who think they don’t have any stories to tell.  Find here

    Do you have any favorite stories about writing or what it means to be an author?

  5. Adventures in Learning's Recommendations - Children's Book

    adventuresinlearning:

    I put all the children books I recommended in one place… a good mix of books. What ones should I add?

    Reblogged from: adventuresinlearning
  6. adventuresinlearning:

Important event to attend and promote. Join me at this event on October 11 @Concordia university. #ppu #weekofdignity

this weekend in Portland!

    adventuresinlearning:

    Important event to attend and promote. Join me at this event on October 11 @Concordia university. #ppu #weekofdignity

    this weekend in Portland!

    Reblogged from: adventuresinlearning
  7. My library at school order a number of great books about trans-girls but have had a hard time finding books about trans-boys. Can you recommend any?

    We have found lots of books like “I am Jazz” and “Jacob’s new dress” but are coming up empty when looking for a more diverse range of gender identity.

     My hope is use the right phrasing, but honestly I went back and forth trying to figure out how to phrase the question without being confusing. I apologize in advance if I made a mistake. My hope is to find books that provide a range of stories and voice for my students.

  8. adventuresinlearning:

BRAND NEW Book!

I Am Jazz by   Jessica Herthel
Summery: 

I Am Jazz is the story of a transgender child based on the real-life experience of Jazz Jennings, who has become a spokesperson for trans kids everywhere.
From the time she was two years old, Jazz knew that she had a girl’s brain in a boy’s body. She loved pink and dressing up as a mermaid and didn’t feel like herself in boys’ clothing. This confused her family, until they took her to a doctor who said that Jazz was transgender and that she was born that way. Jazz’s story is based on her real-life experience and she tells it in a simple, clear way that will be appreciated by picture book readers, their parents, and teachers.

This new book is awesome! Glad Gender is becoming more of a nuance conversation! Great to think kids can have a book to help them feel more at home in their body! Excited to get this for our class. We are very sensitive to this in our class and we are hoping to create a community in our class that in open to any identity that students feel good about themselves.  Find it here and please support it or share it!
-Adventures in Learning

    adventuresinlearning:

    BRAND NEW Book!

    Summery:

    I Am Jazz is the story of a transgender child based on the real-life experience of Jazz Jennings, who has become a spokesperson for trans kids everywhere.

    From the time she was two years old, Jazz knew that she had a girl’s brain in a boy’s body. She loved pink and dressing up as a mermaid and didn’t feel like herself in boys’ clothing. This confused her family, until they took her to a doctor who said that Jazz was transgender and that she was born that way. Jazz’s story is based on her real-life experience and she tells it in a simple, clear way that will be appreciated by picture book readers, their parents, and teachers.

    This new book is awesome! Glad Gender is becoming more of a nuance conversation! Great to think kids can have a book to help them feel more at home in their body! Excited to get this for our class. We are very sensitive to this in our class and we are hoping to create a community in our class that in open to any identity that students feel good about themselves.  Find it here and please support it or share it!

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  9. adventuresinlearning:

    ailedubooks:

    A Still Quiet Place: A Mindfulness Program for Teaching Children and Adolescents to Ease Stress and Difficult Emotions by Amy Saltzman MD

    Summery:

    A Still Quiet Place presents an eight-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program that therapists, teachers, and other professionals can use to help children and adolescents manage stress and anxiety in their lives, and develop their natural capacities for emotional fluency, respectful communication, and compassionate action. The program detailed in this book is based on author Amy Saltzman’s original curriculum, which has helped countless children and adolescents achieve significant improvements in attention and reduced anxiety.

    One of the easiest ways to find the still quiet place within is to practice mindfulness—paying attention to your life experience here and now with kindness and curiosity. The easy-to-implement mindfulness practices in this guide are designed to help increase children and adolescents’ attention, learning, resiliency, and compassion by showing them how to experience the natural quietness that can be found within.

    The still quiet place is a place of peace and happiness that is alive inside all of us, and you can find it just by closing your eyes and breathing.

    Find it Here

    I am hoping to use some to use this book this year to help create a culture of mindfulness in our classroom. I will be sharing a number of other books on mindfulness that I hope to use in the classroom this year.

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: adventuresinlearning
  10. Adventures in Learning's Recommendations - Mindfulness Education

    adventuresinlearning:

    Here are some more books on Mindfulness for the classroom.

    Reblogged from: adventuresinlearning
  11. Adventures in Learning's Recommendations - Mindfulness Education

    Here are some more books on Mindfulness for the classroom.

  12. Adventures in Learning's Recommendations - Children's Book

    I put all the children books I recommended in one place… a good mix of books. What ones should I add?

  13. ailedubooks:

    blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

    Before There Was Mozart: The Story of Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-George

    Lesa Cline-Ransome

    Joseph Boulogne loved music. The singing of the birds, the beat of drums, the peal of church bells—and most of all, the soaring notes of his violin. But as the son of a white plantation owner and a black slave, newly arrived in France from the West Indies, what chance did Joseph have for success with his music? Here is the true story of an extraordinary boy who overcame the prejudices of his peers to become one of the finest classical musicians in all of Europe.

    Author’s Photo

    This lushly illustrated book by Lesa Cline-Ransome and James E. Ransome introduces us to a talented musician and an overlooked figure in black history.

    Wanted to share this book 

    Find it here

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  14. Mindfulness in the Classroom book series

    by Thich Nhat Hanh

    Summery:Initially designed as stretching breaks between long periods of sitting meditation, Thich Nhat Hanh’s Mindful Movements became so popular they’re now an integral part of his retreats. Based on yoga and tai chi movements, these simple, effective exercises reduce mental, physical, and emotional stress. The book Mindful Movements introduces the program to the general public. The ten routines are designed to be easily accessible and can be performed by people of all ages and all body types, whether they’re familiar with mindful practices or not. They can be done before or after sitting meditation, at home, at work, or any time the reader has a few minutes to refresh both mind and body. For those new to meditation, the exercises are an easy way to get acquainted with mindfulness as a complete, multifaceted practice. For current practitioners, the movements add a welcome physical element to a sitting meditation practice.

    This is the second book of my recommendation for teaching mindfulness in the classroom.  Find it here  and find the first book here

    -Adventures in Learning

  15. A young child is a whole person, as whole at an early stage of life as an adult is whole at a later stage. This means that children are not lesser beings; they are simply at an early stage of life, the all-important formative stage.

    Raffi (via fuckyeahradicaled) Amen!

    PS. Follow Raffi on Twitter.. he is awesome…

    Reblogged from: fuckyeahradicaled
Next

Adventures in Learning

Paper theme built by Thomas