1. adventuresinlearning:

Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice by Sam Chaltain
Great new book about two schools in Washington DC. One public school with a long tradition in DC and A brand new charter school just creating the foundation of a school community.
I highly recommend this book. It is an honest and profound story of the everyday success and struggles in a school. Also provides an insight in what can pragmatically be done help create positive change in our schools. I have worked with Sam Chaltain and believe he was one of the top voice in education transformation in the country!
-Adventures in Learning

    adventuresinlearning:

    Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice by Sam Chaltain

    Great new book about two schools in Washington DC. One public school with a long tradition in DC and A brand new charter school just creating the foundation of a school community.

    I highly recommend this book. It is an honest and profound story of the everyday success and struggles in a school. Also provides an insight in what can pragmatically be done help create positive change in our schools. I have worked with Sam Chaltain and believe he was one of the top voice in education transformation in the country!

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  2. ailedubooks:

    This Is Not A Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education

    by Jose Luis Vilson

    This is on my reading list for the summer! Jose Vilson is one of the best educators currently writing about education. His voice is so strong and pointed. This is an important work and worth sharing with your schools. I hope to read this as a school next year.

    Summery:

    José Vilson writes about race, class, and education through stories from the classroom and researched essays. His rise from rookie math teacher to prominent teacher leader takes a twist when he takes on education reform through his now-blocked eponymous blog, TheJoseVilson.com. He calls for the reclaiming of the education profession while seeking social justice.

    José Vilson is a middle school math educator for in the Inwood/Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. He writes for Edutopia, GOOD, and TransformED / Future of Teaching, and his work has appeared in Education Week, CNN.com, Huffington Post, and El Diario / La Prensa.


    "Jose Vilson is a teacher of the highest order. Through the powerful narrative of his life both inside and outside of the classroom, Jose teaches us important lessons on every page of _This Is Not a Test_. Jose teaches us about the intersection of education, race, class and activism while calling all of us to do better - to be better - as we strive along with him to be the educators all our children need us to be. This book is a must read for educators, soon-to-be educators, parents, students and anyone who cares about education and the children of this country."
    —Chris Lehmann - Founding Principal, Science Leadership Academy

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  3. ailedubooks:

Meeting Dennis Wilson - Complete Edition by Max Harrick Shenk 
This is a great and extremely funny coming of age young adult book. It like a better version of the Wonder Years with way more heart and way more laughs.  This is perfect hammock or beach reading. I read it out loud to my wife last summer for hours at a time. You really get to know the unique engaging and relateable  characters fast and want to follow them along as they figure out what it means to be a teenager in America in the 70’s.
Here is the summery!

COMPLETE SINGLE VOLUME LIMITED EDITION of the seven-book serialized novel. 15 year old softball pitcher (and Beach Boys fan) Margo LeDoux has a crush on Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson, and wants to meet him, but her boyfriend, Scott, doesn’t really like the idea (“I don’t want you runnin’ off and bein’ some groupie!”). Meanwhile, Margo’s best friend (and our narrator) Brian Pressley and his girlfriend, Christy Kelly, decide that they’re going to “take steps” toward going all the way, steps which seem to get them into trouble no matter how careful they are. And then there’s Christy’s big sister Kathy, who’s stricken with a bad case of senioritis and a boyfriend who’s avoiding her just weeks shy of the senior prom… and Brian’s buddy Marty, a shy kid with a Beatles obsession and a crush on Margo… and Margo’s catcher Tara Longbaugh, whose parents have a Beach Boys connection that could get Margo closer to meeting her heartthrob… not to mention parents, brothers, sisters, classmates and teachers who just seem to make life harder, not easier. In Margo’s words: “How do we put UP with all these people?” And how can a girl with a rockstar-sized crush meet the drummer of her dreams? This LIMITED EDITION complete volume contains all of the contents of the seven individual serialized books

Book One of this 7 part serialized novel is currently on sale on amazon kindle for 99 cents.  So you can check it out and get hooked and then move on to the next book…..or buy the whole thing for $9.99 Crazy deal!
No back to my summer reading!
-Adventures in Learning

    ailedubooks:

    Meeting Dennis Wilson - Complete Edition by Max Harrick Shenk

    This is a great and extremely funny coming of age young adult book. It like a better version of the Wonder Years with way more heart and way more laughs.  This is perfect hammock or beach reading. I read it out loud to my wife last summer for hours at a time. You really get to know the unique engaging and relateable  characters fast and want to follow them along as they figure out what it means to be a teenager in America in the 70’s.

    Here is the summery!

    COMPLETE SINGLE VOLUME LIMITED EDITION of the seven-book serialized novel. 15 year old softball pitcher (and Beach Boys fan) Margo LeDoux has a crush on Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson, and wants to meet him, but her boyfriend, Scott, doesn’t really like the idea (“I don’t want you runnin’ off and bein’ some groupie!”). Meanwhile, Margo’s best friend (and our narrator) Brian Pressley and his girlfriend, Christy Kelly, decide that they’re going to “take steps” toward going all the way, steps which seem to get them into trouble no matter how careful they are. And then there’s Christy’s big sister Kathy, who’s stricken with a bad case of senioritis and a boyfriend who’s avoiding her just weeks shy of the senior prom… and Brian’s buddy Marty, a shy kid with a Beatles obsession and a crush on Margo… and Margo’s catcher Tara Longbaugh, whose parents have a Beach Boys connection that could get Margo closer to meeting her heartthrob… not to mention parents, brothers, sisters, classmates and teachers who just seem to make life harder, not easier. In Margo’s words: “How do we put UP with all these people?” And how can a girl with a rockstar-sized crush meet the drummer of her dreams? This LIMITED EDITION complete volume contains all of the contents of the seven individual serialized books

    Book One of this 7 part serialized novel is currently on sale on amazon kindle for 99 cents.  So you can check it out and get hooked and then move on to the next book…..or buy the whole thing for $9.99 Crazy deal!

    No back to my summer reading!

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  4. What book should every teacher read?

    Here are a couple Books recommended by my Tumblr followers:

    1. When Kids Can’t Read: What Teachers Can Do: A Guide for Teachers 6-12  (Via teachertaytay)
    2. How Will You Create Positive Change? by Leah Oviedo. ( Via
      mpwru)
  5. ailedubooks:

medievalpoc:

lierdumoa submitted to medievalpoc:

The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural 
~ by Patricia McKissack & J. Brian Pinkney 
This was one of my favorite short story collections as a child. Ghosts, gods and dark magic from the slave era onward.


Find it here:
The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural 
Here is a little bit about the author:

Patricia McKissack (born August 9, 1944 Smyrna, Tennessee) is an American children’s writer.[1] She is the author of three Dear America books: A Picture of Freedom: The Diary of Clotee, a Slave Girl, Color Me Dark: The Diary of Nellie Lee Love, The Great Migration North, and Look to the Hills: The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl. She has also written a novel for The Royal Diaries series: Nzingha: Warrior Queen of Matamba. Patricia currently lives in St. Louis. 

Summery:

These 10 spine-tinglers range from straight-up ghost stories to eerie narratives. The tales in this winner of the 1993 Coretta Scott King Award depict racism, haunting and vengeance in a manner that can be read out loud around a campfire or savored privately, offering middle readers (fourth through eighth graders) thoughtful exposure to important, though frightening, historical themes. One tale, set in the segregated South of the 1940s, tells of a black man’s ghost avenging his murder by a white klansman. McKissack’s prose is smooth and understated, and its sense of foreboding is powerfully enhanced by Brian Pinkney’s black-and-white scratch board illustrations.

    ailedubooks:

    medievalpoc:

    lierdumoa submitted to medievalpoc:

    The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural 

    ~ by Patricia McKissack J. Brian Pinkney 

    This was one of my favorite short story collections as a child. Ghosts, gods and dark magic from the slave era onward.

    Find it here:

    The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural 

    Here is a little bit about the author:

    Patricia McKissack (born August 9, 1944 Smyrna, Tennessee) is an American children’s writer.[1] She is the author of three Dear America books: A Picture of Freedom: The Diary of Clotee, a Slave Girl, Color Me Dark: The Diary of Nellie Lee Love, The Great Migration North, and Look to the Hills: The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl. She has also written a novel for The Royal Diaries series: Nzingha: Warrior Queen of Matamba. Patricia currently lives in St. Louis

    Summery:

    These 10 spine-tinglers range from straight-up ghost stories to eerie narratives. The tales in this winner of the 1993 Coretta Scott King Award depict racism, haunting and vengeance in a manner that can be read out loud around a campfire or savored privately, offering middle readers (fourth through eighth graders) thoughtful exposure to important, though frightening, historical themes. One tale, set in the segregated South of the 1940s, tells of a black man’s ghost avenging his murder by a white klansman. McKissack’s prose is smooth and understated, and its sense of foreboding is powerfully enhanced by Brian Pinkney’s black-and-white scratch board illustrations.

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  6. ailedubooks:

Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom by Lisa Delpit
This book should be in the curriculum of every teaching college in the country. Lisa Delpit’s work challenges us to really confront what our teaching practices mean in a larger context of social justice. Her writing makes us reflection deeply on many of our must priced notions about progressive education. If you have not been introduced to Delpit’s work, I highly recommend this book or her new book "Multiplication Is for White People": Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children. 
Here is a summery of both:
Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom

In a radical analysis of contemporary classrooms, MacArthur Award–winning author Lisa Delpit develops ideas about ways teachers can be better “cultural transmitters” in the classroom, where prejudice, stereotypes, and cultural assumptions breed ineffective education. Delpit suggests that many academic problems attributed to children of color are actually the result of miscommunication, as primarily white teachers and “other people’s children” struggle with the imbalance of power and the dynamics plaguing our system.A new classic among educators, Other People’s Children is a must-read for teachers, administrators, and parents striving to improve the quality of America’s education system.

Multiplication Is for White People”: Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children

 the award-winning educator reflects on the last fifteen years of reform efforts—including No Child Left Behind, standardized testing, alternative teacher certification paths, and the charter school movement—that have left a generation of poor children of color feeling that higher educational achievement is not for them.Hailed as “illuminating” (Publishers Weekly), “thought-provoking” (Harvard Educational Review), and a “much-needed review of the American educational system” (Kirkus Reviews), "Multiplication Is for White People" is a passionate reminder that there is no achievement gap at birth. Poor teaching, negative stereotypes, and a curriculum that does not adequately connect to poor children’s lives conspire against the prospects of poor children of color. From K-12 classrooms through the college years, Delpit brings the topic of educating other people’s children into the twenty-first century, outlining a blueprint for raising expectations based on a simple premise: that all aspects of advanced education are for everyone.

-Adventures in Learning

    ailedubooks:

    Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom by Lisa Delpit

    This book should be in the curriculum of every teaching college in the country. Lisa Delpit’s work challenges us to really confront what our teaching practices mean in a larger context of social justice. Her writing makes us reflection deeply on many of our must priced notions about progressive education. If you have not been introduced to Delpit’s work, I highly recommend this book or her new book "Multiplication Is for White People": Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children.

    Here is a summery of both:

    Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom

    In a radical analysis of contemporary classrooms, MacArthur Award–winning author Lisa Delpit develops ideas about ways teachers can be better “cultural transmitters” in the classroom, where prejudice, stereotypes, and cultural assumptions breed ineffective education. Delpit suggests that many academic problems attributed to children of color are actually the result of miscommunication, as primarily white teachers and “other people’s children” struggle with the imbalance of power and the dynamics plaguing our system.

    A new classic among educators, Other People’s Children is a must-read for teachers, administrators, and parents striving to improve the quality of America’s education system.

    Multiplication Is for White People”: Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children

     the award-winning educator reflects on the last fifteen years of reform efforts—including No Child Left Behind, standardized testing, alternative teacher certification paths, and the charter school movement—that have left a generation of poor children of color feeling that higher educational achievement is not for them.

    Hailed as “illuminating” (Publishers Weekly), “thought-provoking” (Harvard Educational Review), and a “much-needed review of the American educational system” (Kirkus Reviews), "Multiplication Is for White People" is a passionate reminder that there is no achievement gap at birth. Poor teaching, negative stereotypes, and a curriculum that does not adequately connect to poor children’s lives conspire against the prospects of poor children of color. From K-12 classrooms through the college years, Delpit brings the topic of educating other people’s children into the twenty-first century, outlining a blueprint for raising expectations based on a simple premise: that all aspects of advanced education are for everyone.

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  7. (via Video: American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs | Watch POV Online | PBS Video)

    Everyone everywhere can and must watch this movie! So important! The story of Grace Lee Boggs, the story of Detroit, the story of America and the story of our evolution! Please watch and share.

  8. ailedubooks:

unknownamericans:

My father came to the United States from Panama in 1971. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Delaware, and then went on to get his master’s in chemical engineering from Northwestern. He was a student who ended up meeting a girl, who changed the course of his life, and he’s been living here ever since. It’s an ordinary story, one that will never end up in a newspaper or the subject of a feature film. But to me, that’s why it’s important.
One of my hopes for The Book of Unknown Americans was that it might tell the stories that people don’t usually hear, either because there’s rarely a chance for immigrants to make their own voices heard in a public way or because people don’t listen. And now, another hope: that you all might share your stories, too, no matter how ordinary they might seem to you. A few sentences, a few paragraphs. It’s up to you. Where did you come from? How long have you been here? What is your life like now? We’ll create a chorus, and in the accumulation of the ordinary, become extraordinary. 
— Cristina Henriquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans: A novel

The Book of Unknown Americans: A novel
I have not read yet. But worth sharing! A very important story to be told and shared!

    ailedubooks:

    unknownamericans:

    My father came to the United States from Panama in 1971. He earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Delaware, and then went on to get his master’s in chemical engineering from Northwestern. He was a student who ended up meeting a girl, who changed the course of his life, and he’s been living here ever since. It’s an ordinary story, one that will never end up in a newspaper or the subject of a feature film. But to me, that’s why it’s important.

    One of my hopes for The Book of Unknown Americans was that it might tell the stories that people don’t usually hear, either because there’s rarely a chance for immigrants to make their own voices heard in a public way or because people don’t listen. And now, another hope: that you all might share your stories, too, no matter how ordinary they might seem to you. A few sentences, a few paragraphs. It’s up to you. Where did you come from? How long have you been here? What is your life like now? We’ll create a chorus, and in the accumulation of the ordinary, become extraordinary. 

    — Cristina Henriquez, author of The Book of Unknown Americans: A novel

    The Book of Unknown Americans: A novel

    I have not read yet. But worth sharing! A very important story to be told and shared!

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  9. ailedubooks:


breenaisawalrus said: "Teacher" by Sylvia Ashton-Warner who said “When I teach people, I marry them”. Wonderful.

This is a great book. So many of my favorite books recommend or cite this book as an influence. Really a lot to be learned from this book. Her methods of teaching reading and writing have influenced many, but it was her story that really touched me. 
Thanks of for the recommendation breenaisawalrus!
Here is a summery:

TEACHER was first published in 1963 to excited acclaim. Its author, Sylvia Ashton-Warner, who lived in New Zealand and spent many years teaching Maori children, found that Maoris taught according to British methods were not learning to read. They were passionate, moody children, bred in an ancient legend-haunted tradition; how could she build them a bridge to European culture that would enable them to take hold of the great joy of reading? Ashton-Warner devised a method whereby written words became prized possessions for her students. Today, her findings are strikingly relevant to the teaching of socially disadvantaged and non-English-speaking students. TEACHER is part diary, part inspired description of Ashton-Warner’s teaching method in action. Her fiercely loved children come alive individually, as do the unique setting and the character of this extraordinary woman.

-Adventures in Learning

Via Adventures in Learning’s Recommendations

    ailedubooks:

    breenaisawalrus said: "Teacher" by Sylvia Ashton-Warner who said “When I teach people, I marry them”. Wonderful.

    This is a great book. So many of my favorite books recommend or cite this book as an influence. Really a lot to be learned from this book. Her methods of teaching reading and writing have influenced many, but it was her story that really touched me.

    Thanks of for the recommendation breenaisawalrus!

    Here is a summery:

    TEACHER was first published in 1963 to excited acclaim. Its author, Sylvia Ashton-Warner, who lived in New Zealand and spent many years teaching Maori children, found that Maoris taught according to British methods were not learning to read. They were passionate, moody children, bred in an ancient legend-haunted tradition; how could she build them a bridge to European culture that would enable them to take hold of the great joy of reading? Ashton-Warner devised a method whereby written words became prized possessions for her students. Today, her findings are strikingly relevant to the teaching of socially disadvantaged and non-English-speaking students. TEACHER is part diary, part inspired description of Ashton-Warner’s teaching method in action. Her fiercely loved children come alive individually, as do the unique setting and the character of this extraordinary woman.

    -Adventures in Learning

    Via Adventures in Learning’s Recommendations

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  10. The Forgotten Story of the Freedom Schools

    The 50th anniversary is taking place right now in Jackson! I was able to visit Jackson in the Fall and visit with many of the veteran civil rights leaders that were part of the original Freedom Summer. I highly recommend learning more about the Freedom Schools and Freedom Summer. I also recommend making the trip to Jackson, a lot of amazing progressive world changing things happening there right now. A lot to learn!

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: so-treu
  11. 

therealsurferrosa said: ‘Teaching as a Subversive Activity’ Postman & Weingartner. It’s why I became a teacher and, after twenty years, it’s what I wrote my dissertation around. Probably out of print now and needed more than ever!

Thanks for the suggestion. I have come past this many times and will pick it up again and read it with a new set of eyes. Both authors have really changed education for the better! Luckily, it is not out of print. There is even a Kindle version.  This book is basically a manifesto for inquiry based education. 
Here is a quote:

“There is no way to help a learner to be disciplined, active, and thoroughly engaged unless he perceives a problem to be a problem or whatever is to-be-learned as worth learning, and unless he plays an active role in determining the process of solution.”  ― Neil Postman,  Teaching as a Subversive Activity 

This quote perfectly defines the basic ideas of inquiry based education. 
-Adventures in Learning (via Adventures in Learning’s Recommendations)

    therealsurferrosa said: Teaching as a Subversive Activity’ Postman & Weingartner. It’s why I became a teacher and, after twenty years, it’s what I wrote my dissertation around. Probably out of print now and needed more than ever!

    Thanks for the suggestion. I have come past this many times and will pick it up again and read it with a new set of eyes. Both authors have really changed education for the better! Luckily, it is not out of print. There is even a Kindle version.  This book is basically a manifesto for inquiry based education.

    Here is a quote:

    “There is no way to help a learner to be disciplined, active, and thoroughly engaged unless he perceives a problem to be a problem or whatever is to-be-learned as worth learning, and unless he plays an active role in determining the process of solution.”
    Neil Postman, Teaching as a Subversive Activity

    This quote perfectly defines the basic ideas of inquiry based education.

    -Adventures in Learning (via Adventures in Learning’s Recommendations)

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  12. Adventures in Learning's Recommendations

    My new tumblr blogs… all my recommendations for great education books and more.

  13. Recommended Education Books for June 23-29th 2014

    1. To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher 3rd Edition; By William Ayers
    2. To Teach: The Journey, in Comics; By William Ayers
    3. An Ethic of Excellence: Building a Culture of Craftsmanship with Students by Ron Berger
    4. The Power of Their Ideas: Lessons for America from a Small School in Harlem By Deborah Meier
    5. You Can’t Say You Can’t Play by Vivian Gussin Paley
    6. Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice by Sam Chaltain
    7. Education and the Significance of Life by J. Krishnamurti

    My longer recommendations can be found via my new blog Adventures in Learning’s Recommendations or just by searching my archive page.

    I will start up a new batch tomorrow. I am also taking recommendations for books to share. Please share books that have changed your teaching or life for the better, education or not. Also write a few reasons why you recommend the book and how it changed you. Will post guest recommendation later this week! Pick up one of these books for some good summer reading! 

  14. Two Versions of one great book!

    To Teach: The Journey of a Teacher 3rd Edition; By William Ayers

    To Teach: The Journey, in Comics; By William Ayers

    One of the first books I read during my masters program. This is another of what I call my “Mentor Texts”. It is a book that speak to the complexity of being a teacher, an activist, a community member, and all the roles in-between.   William “Bill” Ayers writes with a heart and courage unmatched in most books written about education and schools. Plus he did a comic version of the book, so cool! I got to see Ayers talk in Eugene a few years back. He is radical, he is fiery, he is outspoken, but most of all he cares about teachers and children and education and he understands the power and role Public Schools hold in changing our world for the better! Another must read!

    Buy one, or by them both! :) 

    What ever you do. Get a hold of this book!

    Summery:

    To Teach is the now-classic story of one teacher’s odyssey into the ethical and intellectual heart of teaching. For almost two decades, it has inspired teachers across the country to follow their own path, face their own challenges, and become the teachers they long to be. Since the second edition, there have been dramatic shifts to the educational landscape including the rise and fall of NCLB. This new Third Edition is essential reading amidst today’s public policy debates and school reform initiatives that stress the importance of ”good teaching.” To help bring this popular story to a new generation of teachers, Teachers College Press is publishing an exciting companion volume: To Teach: The Journey, in Comics. In this graphic novel, Ayers and talented young artist Ryan Alexander-Tanner bring the celebrated memoir to life. The Third Edition of To Teach, paired with the new graphic novel, offers a unique teaching and learning experience that broadens and deepens our understanding of what teaching can be. Together, these resources will capture the imaginations of pre- and in-service teachers who are ready to follow their own Yellow Brick Roads.

    -Adventures in Learning

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