1. occupyedu:

I think it’s worth a fight!

    occupyedu:

    I think it’s worth a fight!

    Reblogged from: occupyedu
  2. Blogging Camp Day 3 included interviews with Junior spies, and doll clothes designers; learning how to post cute puppy pictures; an inspirational walk in the woods to generate fictional stories; research on Pugdoodles; and a introduction to reggae music. School should be designed more like summer camp. #summer2014 #kidblogs

    Blogging Camp Day 3 included interviews with Junior spies, and doll clothes designers; learning how to post cute puppy pictures; an inspirational walk in the woods to generate fictional stories; research on Pugdoodles; and a introduction to reggae music. School should be designed more like summer camp. #summer2014 #kidblogs

  3. ailedubooks:

    Adventures in Learning Asked:

    What is your favorite book to read to students?

    Or have students read?

    @obertogreco answered: Two books: The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip, by George Saunders and Some of the Kinder Planets, by Time Wynne-Jones

    Book one:

    The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip, by George Saunders

    Three families live in the seaside village of Frip — the Romos, the Ronsens, and a little girl named Capable and her widowed father. The townspeople of Frip make their living raising goats, but they must fight off a daily invasion of gappers, bright orange, many-eyed creatures that cover goats and stop them from giving milk. When the gappers target Capable’s goats, the Romos and the Ronsens turn their backs on the gapper-ridden Capable. What will Capable do about her gapper plague? An imaginative tale by acclaimed author George Saunders accented with haunting illustrations by award-winning illustrator Lane Smith, The Very Persistent Gappers of Frip is an adult story for children, a children’s story for adults, an oceanside fable for the landlocked, a fish story for loaves, and a fable about the true meaning of community.

    Note from Adventures in Learning: This one really excites me, not sure how I didn’t know about this one!  I’m going to pick this up to use in my acting camp this summer. Stories like this work perfectly to inspire improv and acting with my students! Excited! You can get it here also.

    Book two:

    Some of the Kinder Planets, by Time Wynne-Jones

    This collection of nine short stories offers offbeat vignettes of contemporary life as well as tales of ghosts, aliens, and historical figures. Clear writing combines with clever concepts and varied subject matter to make the book accessible and enjoyable to a wide audience. Male and female characters of all ages are convincing and well rounded, an especially impressive achievement given the brevity of the pieces. While not all of them are intended to be funny, Wynne-Jones has a light touch that serves him well whether his topic is serious or humorous. Also, a certain ambiguity is often present, and the stories offer tantalizing glimpses of complex worlds. This sophisticated presentation of both everyday experiences (such as a not-so-successful science project) and unusual situations (the aftermath of a train accident) creates a uniquely appealing whole.

    Note from Adventures in Learning: Another book new to me! This is why I love crowdsourcing book recommendations, so many new books to be found! Keep them coming!

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  4. Or have students read?

  5. I asked my tumblr followers:

    What book should every teacher read?

    here are zwelinzima answers:

    In no order,

    1.) The Book of Learning and Forgetting, by Frank Smith, discusses social relevance and control

    In this thought-provoking book, Frank Smith explains how schools and educational authorities systematically obstruct the powerful inherent learning abilities of children, creating handicaps that often persist through life. The author eloquently contrasts a false and fabricated “official theory” that learning is work (used to justify the external control of teachers and students through excessive regulation and massive testing) with a correct but officially suppressed “classic view” that learning is a social process that can occur naturally and continually through collaborative activities. This book will be crucial reading in a time when national authorities continue to blame teachers and students for alleged failures in education. It will help educators and parents to combat sterile attitudes toward teaching and learning and prevent current practices from doing further harm.

    2.) Teaching as a Subversive Activity, by Neil Postman and Charles Weingartner, speaks, again—directly and eloquently—on liberating young minds (here is my recommendation again)

    “There is no way to help a learner to be disciplined, active, and thoroughly engaged unless he perceives a problem to be a problem or whatever is to-be-learned as worth learning, and unless he plays an active role in determining the process of solution.”
    Neil Postman, Teaching as a Subversive Activity

    3.) Walking on Water, by Derrick Jensen, has just awesome stories with terrific lessons about asking questions (Note: I also recommend this book highly)

    Walking on Water is a startling and provocative look at teaching, writing, creativity, and life by a writer increasingly recognized for his passionate and articulate critique of modern civilization. This time Derrick Jensen brings us into his classroom—whether college or maximum security prison—where he teaches writing. He reveals how schools perpetuate the great illusion that happiness lies outside of ourselves and that learning to please and submit to those in power makes us into lifelong clock-watchers. As a writing teacher Jensen guides his students out of the confines of traditional education to find their own voices, freedom, and creativity.

  6. ailedubooks:

    What book should every Teacher read?

    @savytrufle said: Tested: One American School Struggles to Make the Grade by Linda Perlstein

    Summery:

    A “vivid, unpredictable, fair, balanced and … very entertaining” look at how education reforms have changed one typical American elementary school over the course of a year (Jay Mathews, The Washington Post)

    The pressure is on at schools across America. In recent years, reforms such as No Child Left Behind have created a new vision of education that emphasizes provable results, uniformity, and greater attention for floundering students. Schools are expected to behave more like businesses and are judged almost solely on the bottom line: test scores.

    To see if this world is producing better students, Linda Perlstein immersed herself in a suburban Maryland elementary school, once deemed a failure, that is now held up as an example of reform done right. Perlstein explores the rewards and costs of that transformation, and the resulting portrait—detailed, human, and truly thought-provoking—provides the first detailed view of how new education policies are modified by human realities. 

    Find it here

    Have not read this one, but adding it to my summer reading list. Love books that showcase a year in the life of schools.

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  7. Reblogged from: adventuresinlearning
  8. ailedubooks:

    blackchildrensbooksandauthors:

    Before There Was Mozart: The Story of Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint-George

    Lesa Cline-Ransome

    Joseph Boulogne loved music. The singing of the birds, the beat of drums, the peal of church bells—and most of all, the soaring notes of his violin. But as the son of a white plantation owner and a black slave, newly arrived in France from the West Indies, what chance did Joseph have for success with his music? Here is the true story of an extraordinary boy who overcame the prejudices of his peers to become one of the finest classical musicians in all of Europe.

    Author’s Photo

    This lushly illustrated book by Lesa Cline-Ransome and James E. Ransome introduces us to a talented musician and an overlooked figure in black history.

    Wanted to share this book 

    Find it here

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  9. adventuresinlearning:

Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice by Sam Chaltain
Great new book about two schools in Washington DC. One public school with a long tradition in DC and A brand new charter school just creating the foundation of a school community.
I highly recommend this book. It is an honest and profound story of the everyday success and struggles in a school. Also provides an insight in what can pragmatically be done help create positive change in our schools. I have worked with Sam Chaltain and believe he was one of the top voice in education transformation in the country!
-Adventures in Learning

    adventuresinlearning:

    Our School: Searching for Community in the Era of Choice by Sam Chaltain

    Great new book about two schools in Washington DC. One public school with a long tradition in DC and A brand new charter school just creating the foundation of a school community.

    I highly recommend this book. It is an honest and profound story of the everyday success and struggles in a school. Also provides an insight in what can pragmatically be done help create positive change in our schools. I have worked with Sam Chaltain and believe he was one of the top voice in education transformation in the country!

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  10. ailedubooks:

    This Is Not A Test: A New Narrative on Race, Class, and Education

    by Jose Luis Vilson

    This is on my reading list for the summer! Jose Vilson is one of the best educators currently writing about education. His voice is so strong and pointed. This is an important work and worth sharing with your schools. I hope to read this as a school next year.

    Summery:

    José Vilson writes about race, class, and education through stories from the classroom and researched essays. His rise from rookie math teacher to prominent teacher leader takes a twist when he takes on education reform through his now-blocked eponymous blog, TheJoseVilson.com. He calls for the reclaiming of the education profession while seeking social justice.

    José Vilson is a middle school math educator for in the Inwood/Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. He writes for Edutopia, GOOD, and TransformED / Future of Teaching, and his work has appeared in Education Week, CNN.com, Huffington Post, and El Diario / La Prensa.


    "Jose Vilson is a teacher of the highest order. Through the powerful narrative of his life both inside and outside of the classroom, Jose teaches us important lessons on every page of _This Is Not a Test_. Jose teaches us about the intersection of education, race, class and activism while calling all of us to do better - to be better - as we strive along with him to be the educators all our children need us to be. This book is a must read for educators, soon-to-be educators, parents, students and anyone who cares about education and the children of this country."
    —Chris Lehmann - Founding Principal, Science Leadership Academy

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  11. ailedubooks:

Meeting Dennis Wilson - Complete Edition by Max Harrick Shenk 
This is a great and extremely funny coming of age young adult book. It like a better version of the Wonder Years with way more heart and way more laughs.  This is perfect hammock or beach reading. I read it out loud to my wife last summer for hours at a time. You really get to know the unique engaging and relateable  characters fast and want to follow them along as they figure out what it means to be a teenager in America in the 70’s.
Here is the summery!

COMPLETE SINGLE VOLUME LIMITED EDITION of the seven-book serialized novel. 15 year old softball pitcher (and Beach Boys fan) Margo LeDoux has a crush on Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson, and wants to meet him, but her boyfriend, Scott, doesn’t really like the idea (“I don’t want you runnin’ off and bein’ some groupie!”). Meanwhile, Margo’s best friend (and our narrator) Brian Pressley and his girlfriend, Christy Kelly, decide that they’re going to “take steps” toward going all the way, steps which seem to get them into trouble no matter how careful they are. And then there’s Christy’s big sister Kathy, who’s stricken with a bad case of senioritis and a boyfriend who’s avoiding her just weeks shy of the senior prom… and Brian’s buddy Marty, a shy kid with a Beatles obsession and a crush on Margo… and Margo’s catcher Tara Longbaugh, whose parents have a Beach Boys connection that could get Margo closer to meeting her heartthrob… not to mention parents, brothers, sisters, classmates and teachers who just seem to make life harder, not easier. In Margo’s words: “How do we put UP with all these people?” And how can a girl with a rockstar-sized crush meet the drummer of her dreams? This LIMITED EDITION complete volume contains all of the contents of the seven individual serialized books

Book One of this 7 part serialized novel is currently on sale on amazon kindle for 99 cents.  So you can check it out and get hooked and then move on to the next book…..or buy the whole thing for $9.99 Crazy deal!
No back to my summer reading!
-Adventures in Learning

    ailedubooks:

    Meeting Dennis Wilson - Complete Edition by Max Harrick Shenk

    This is a great and extremely funny coming of age young adult book. It like a better version of the Wonder Years with way more heart and way more laughs.  This is perfect hammock or beach reading. I read it out loud to my wife last summer for hours at a time. You really get to know the unique engaging and relateable  characters fast and want to follow them along as they figure out what it means to be a teenager in America in the 70’s.

    Here is the summery!

    COMPLETE SINGLE VOLUME LIMITED EDITION of the seven-book serialized novel. 15 year old softball pitcher (and Beach Boys fan) Margo LeDoux has a crush on Beach Boys drummer Dennis Wilson, and wants to meet him, but her boyfriend, Scott, doesn’t really like the idea (“I don’t want you runnin’ off and bein’ some groupie!”). Meanwhile, Margo’s best friend (and our narrator) Brian Pressley and his girlfriend, Christy Kelly, decide that they’re going to “take steps” toward going all the way, steps which seem to get them into trouble no matter how careful they are. And then there’s Christy’s big sister Kathy, who’s stricken with a bad case of senioritis and a boyfriend who’s avoiding her just weeks shy of the senior prom… and Brian’s buddy Marty, a shy kid with a Beatles obsession and a crush on Margo… and Margo’s catcher Tara Longbaugh, whose parents have a Beach Boys connection that could get Margo closer to meeting her heartthrob… not to mention parents, brothers, sisters, classmates and teachers who just seem to make life harder, not easier. In Margo’s words: “How do we put UP with all these people?” And how can a girl with a rockstar-sized crush meet the drummer of her dreams? This LIMITED EDITION complete volume contains all of the contents of the seven individual serialized books

    Book One of this 7 part serialized novel is currently on sale on amazon kindle for 99 cents.  So you can check it out and get hooked and then move on to the next book…..or buy the whole thing for $9.99 Crazy deal!

    No back to my summer reading!

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  12. What book should every teacher read?

    Here are a couple Books recommended by my Tumblr followers:

    1. When Kids Can’t Read: What Teachers Can Do: A Guide for Teachers 6-12  (Via teachertaytay)
    2. How Will You Create Positive Change? by Leah Oviedo. ( Via
      mpwru)
  13. ailedubooks:

medievalpoc:

lierdumoa submitted to medievalpoc:

The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural 
~ by Patricia McKissack & J. Brian Pinkney 
This was one of my favorite short story collections as a child. Ghosts, gods and dark magic from the slave era onward.


Find it here:
The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural 
Here is a little bit about the author:

Patricia McKissack (born August 9, 1944 Smyrna, Tennessee) is an American children’s writer.[1] She is the author of three Dear America books: A Picture of Freedom: The Diary of Clotee, a Slave Girl, Color Me Dark: The Diary of Nellie Lee Love, The Great Migration North, and Look to the Hills: The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl. She has also written a novel for The Royal Diaries series: Nzingha: Warrior Queen of Matamba. Patricia currently lives in St. Louis. 

Summery:

These 10 spine-tinglers range from straight-up ghost stories to eerie narratives. The tales in this winner of the 1993 Coretta Scott King Award depict racism, haunting and vengeance in a manner that can be read out loud around a campfire or savored privately, offering middle readers (fourth through eighth graders) thoughtful exposure to important, though frightening, historical themes. One tale, set in the segregated South of the 1940s, tells of a black man’s ghost avenging his murder by a white klansman. McKissack’s prose is smooth and understated, and its sense of foreboding is powerfully enhanced by Brian Pinkney’s black-and-white scratch board illustrations.

    ailedubooks:

    medievalpoc:

    lierdumoa submitted to medievalpoc:

    The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural 

    ~ by Patricia McKissack J. Brian Pinkney 

    This was one of my favorite short story collections as a child. Ghosts, gods and dark magic from the slave era onward.

    Find it here:

    The Dark-Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural 

    Here is a little bit about the author:

    Patricia McKissack (born August 9, 1944 Smyrna, Tennessee) is an American children’s writer.[1] She is the author of three Dear America books: A Picture of Freedom: The Diary of Clotee, a Slave Girl, Color Me Dark: The Diary of Nellie Lee Love, The Great Migration North, and Look to the Hills: The Diary of Lozette Moreau, a French Slave Girl. She has also written a novel for The Royal Diaries series: Nzingha: Warrior Queen of Matamba. Patricia currently lives in St. Louis

    Summery:

    These 10 spine-tinglers range from straight-up ghost stories to eerie narratives. The tales in this winner of the 1993 Coretta Scott King Award depict racism, haunting and vengeance in a manner that can be read out loud around a campfire or savored privately, offering middle readers (fourth through eighth graders) thoughtful exposure to important, though frightening, historical themes. One tale, set in the segregated South of the 1940s, tells of a black man’s ghost avenging his murder by a white klansman. McKissack’s prose is smooth and understated, and its sense of foreboding is powerfully enhanced by Brian Pinkney’s black-and-white scratch board illustrations.

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
  14. ailedubooks:

Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom by Lisa Delpit
This book should be in the curriculum of every teaching college in the country. Lisa Delpit’s work challenges us to really confront what our teaching practices mean in a larger context of social justice. Her writing makes us reflection deeply on many of our must priced notions about progressive education. If you have not been introduced to Delpit’s work, I highly recommend this book or her new book "Multiplication Is for White People": Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children. 
Here is a summery of both:
Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom

In a radical analysis of contemporary classrooms, MacArthur Award–winning author Lisa Delpit develops ideas about ways teachers can be better “cultural transmitters” in the classroom, where prejudice, stereotypes, and cultural assumptions breed ineffective education. Delpit suggests that many academic problems attributed to children of color are actually the result of miscommunication, as primarily white teachers and “other people’s children” struggle with the imbalance of power and the dynamics plaguing our system.A new classic among educators, Other People’s Children is a must-read for teachers, administrators, and parents striving to improve the quality of America’s education system.

Multiplication Is for White People”: Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children

 the award-winning educator reflects on the last fifteen years of reform efforts—including No Child Left Behind, standardized testing, alternative teacher certification paths, and the charter school movement—that have left a generation of poor children of color feeling that higher educational achievement is not for them.Hailed as “illuminating” (Publishers Weekly), “thought-provoking” (Harvard Educational Review), and a “much-needed review of the American educational system” (Kirkus Reviews), "Multiplication Is for White People" is a passionate reminder that there is no achievement gap at birth. Poor teaching, negative stereotypes, and a curriculum that does not adequately connect to poor children’s lives conspire against the prospects of poor children of color. From K-12 classrooms through the college years, Delpit brings the topic of educating other people’s children into the twenty-first century, outlining a blueprint for raising expectations based on a simple premise: that all aspects of advanced education are for everyone.

-Adventures in Learning

    ailedubooks:

    Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom by Lisa Delpit

    This book should be in the curriculum of every teaching college in the country. Lisa Delpit’s work challenges us to really confront what our teaching practices mean in a larger context of social justice. Her writing makes us reflection deeply on many of our must priced notions about progressive education. If you have not been introduced to Delpit’s work, I highly recommend this book or her new book "Multiplication Is for White People": Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children.

    Here is a summery of both:

    Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom

    In a radical analysis of contemporary classrooms, MacArthur Award–winning author Lisa Delpit develops ideas about ways teachers can be better “cultural transmitters” in the classroom, where prejudice, stereotypes, and cultural assumptions breed ineffective education. Delpit suggests that many academic problems attributed to children of color are actually the result of miscommunication, as primarily white teachers and “other people’s children” struggle with the imbalance of power and the dynamics plaguing our system.

    A new classic among educators, Other People’s Children is a must-read for teachers, administrators, and parents striving to improve the quality of America’s education system.

    Multiplication Is for White People”: Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children

     the award-winning educator reflects on the last fifteen years of reform efforts—including No Child Left Behind, standardized testing, alternative teacher certification paths, and the charter school movement—that have left a generation of poor children of color feeling that higher educational achievement is not for them.

    Hailed as “illuminating” (Publishers Weekly), “thought-provoking” (Harvard Educational Review), and a “much-needed review of the American educational system” (Kirkus Reviews), "Multiplication Is for White People" is a passionate reminder that there is no achievement gap at birth. Poor teaching, negative stereotypes, and a curriculum that does not adequately connect to poor children’s lives conspire against the prospects of poor children of color. From K-12 classrooms through the college years, Delpit brings the topic of educating other people’s children into the twenty-first century, outlining a blueprint for raising expectations based on a simple premise: that all aspects of advanced education are for everyone.

    -Adventures in Learning

    Reblogged from: ailedubooks
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