‘you never know from where ideas will come
humanscaleschools:

(via What It Takes To Innovate: Wrong-Thinking, Tinkering & Intuiting :: Articles :: The 99 Percent)
“4. Sketch out their ideas.Even in our screen-obsessed era, effective innovators still hash out ideas on paper. (If you don’t believe me, check out this 99% talk from Twitter creator Jack Dorsey, who sketched out the original concept at age 15.) Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, was also an inveterate sketcher. Bell’s notebooks reveal the inner-workings of a hyperactive brain: diagrams for crazy flying machines, sound devices, and even see-saws, drawn with a whacky artistic sensibility akin to that of Henry Darger or David Shrigley. “
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This whole article is brilliant. I like this one a lot. I have notice that notebooks or journal are being used more in classrooms in both elementary and high school, but what are we using them for? Are we using them to collect thoughts, ideas, creative projects… or just as another place to put down content, that only the teacher sees.
Love to hear examples of using notebooks/sketch books outside of the purely academic realms….
anyone doing that in their classroom?
-Adventures in Learning (via Human Centered Schools)

humanscaleschools:

(via What It Takes To Innovate: Wrong-Thinking, Tinkering & Intuiting :: Articles :: The 99 Percent)

4. Sketch out their ideas.
Even in our screen-obsessed era, effective innovators still hash out ideas on paper. (If you don’t believe me, check out this 99% talk from Twitter creator Jack Dorsey, who sketched out the original concept at age 15.) Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, was also an inveterate sketcher. Bell’s notebooks reveal the inner-workings of a hyperactive brain: diagrams for crazy flying machines, sound devices, and even see-saws, drawn with a whacky artistic sensibility akin to that of Henry Darger or David Shrigley. “

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This whole article is brilliant. I like this one a lot. I have notice that notebooks or journal are being used more in classrooms in both elementary and high school, but what are we using them for? Are we using them to collect thoughts, ideas, creative projects… or just as another place to put down content, that only the teacher sees.

Love to hear examples of using notebooks/sketch books outside of the purely academic realms….

anyone doing that in their classroom?

-Adventures in Learning (via Human Centered Schools)

Human beings are by nature generators of ideas, what I didn’t understand was how it was that some children recognized the power of their ideas while others became alienated from their own genius. How did schools, in small and unconscious ways, silence these persistent playground intellectuals? Could schools, if organized differently, keep this nascent power alive, extend it, and thus make a difference in what we grow up to be?