1. imagininglearning:

“Creativity is Contagious. Pass it on!” Albert Einstein 
Imagining Learning is creating a national collective voice on the wisdom of young people on how they would reinvent education. Pass It On! ~ Charlie Kouns 
Source (Imagining Learning)

Pass it On!
    Reblogged from: imagininglearning
  2. This great article written by Peter Grey provides the argument for more freedom in our classrooms and for less tests with finite answers.

    “Creativity is nurtured by freedom and stifled by the continuous monitoring, evaluation, adult-direction, and pressure to conform that restrict children’s lives today.  In the real world few questions have one right answer, few problems have one right solution; that’s why creativity is crucial to success in the real world.  But more and more we are subjecting children to an educational system that assumes one right answer to every question and one correct solution to every problem, a system that punishes children (and their teachers too) for daring to try different routes. “

    Are we providing students with the chance to be creative and expand they ability to imagine, rethink, and improve our society and themselves. It also highlights the argument that testing creativity standardized testing or multiple choice short answers will not work. Classrooms that support creatively and purposeful freedom are not only good for our students, but also for a success democratic society.

  3. via (IDEA: The Institute for Democratic Education in America)
  4. Want To Be More Creative? Get Bored

    joyismymiddlename:

    Boredom is becoming an endangered activity but when we’re at our most bored we’re forced to push our creative boundaries. So in this over-stimulated environment of 21st century living, don’t forget to be bored every once in awhile.

    Also getting lost! Sometimes are best discovers come from being lost! My rule is to only use GPS when I need to be somewhere… other than that it might be better to just find it yourself….. Bored and lost are what SUndays were made for!

    Reblogged from: notational
  5. humanscaleschools:

(via What It Takes To Innovate: Wrong-Thinking, Tinkering & Intuiting :: Articles :: The 99 Percent)
“4. Sketch out their ideas.Even in our screen-obsessed era, effective innovators still hash out ideas on paper. (If you don’t believe me, check out this 99% talk from Twitter creator Jack Dorsey, who sketched out the original concept at age 15.) Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, was also an inveterate sketcher. Bell’s notebooks reveal the inner-workings of a hyperactive brain: diagrams for crazy flying machines, sound devices, and even see-saws, drawn with a whacky artistic sensibility akin to that of Henry Darger or David Shrigley. “
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This whole article is brilliant. I like this one a lot. I have notice that notebooks or journal are being used more in classrooms in both elementary and high school, but what are we using them for? Are we using them to collect thoughts, ideas, creative projects… or just as another place to put down content, that only the teacher sees.
Love to hear examples of using notebooks/sketch books outside of the purely academic realms….
anyone doing that in their classroom?
-Adventures in Learning (via Human Centered Schools)

    humanscaleschools:

    (via What It Takes To Innovate: Wrong-Thinking, Tinkering & Intuiting :: Articles :: The 99 Percent)

    4. Sketch out their ideas.
    Even in our screen-obsessed era, effective innovators still hash out ideas on paper. (If you don’t believe me, check out this 99% talk from Twitter creator Jack Dorsey, who sketched out the original concept at age 15.) Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, was also an inveterate sketcher. Bell’s notebooks reveal the inner-workings of a hyperactive brain: diagrams for crazy flying machines, sound devices, and even see-saws, drawn with a whacky artistic sensibility akin to that of Henry Darger or David Shrigley. “

    —————————————————————————

    This whole article is brilliant. I like this one a lot. I have notice that notebooks or journal are being used more in classrooms in both elementary and high school, but what are we using them for? Are we using them to collect thoughts, ideas, creative projects… or just as another place to put down content, that only the teacher sees.

    Love to hear examples of using notebooks/sketch books outside of the purely academic realms….

    anyone doing that in their classroom?

    -Adventures in Learning (via Human Centered Schools)

    Reblogged from: humanscaleschools
  6. An essential aspect of creativity is not being afraid to fail. Scientists made a great invention by calling their activities hypotheses and experiments. They made it permissible to fail repeatedly until in the end they got the results they wanted. In politics or government, if you made a hypothesis and it didn’t work out, you had your head cut off.

    Edwin Land

    What It Takes To Innovate: Wrong-Thinking, Tinkering & Intuiting :: Articles :: The 99 Percent

    I think school is the perfect place to embrace this type of experimentation of life. That is why we need to have less lesson planning and more question asking, more tinkering, more wondering, more being bored and confused, both by the teacher and the students. If we come into class every day with the answers it is hard to leave with anything new.

    How often do you embrace the process of experimentation and process of true creative thought? Is your classroom a laboratory or a factory?

    -adventures in learning

  7. skillshare:

    “Creativity is not inspired by the pressure of time, but by the freedom, the playfulness + the fun.”

    Not sure I could of said it better myself!

    Reblogged from: skillshare
  8. occupyedu:

I occupy education:
Creativity & Connection & Art & Joy & Grit in a Studio Environment.
Children have a right to create culture instead of consume it!
http://atelier.schoolwithinschool.org

    occupyedu:

    I occupy education:

    Creativity & Connection & Art & Joy & Grit in a Studio Environment.

    Children have a right to create culture instead of consume it!

    http://atelier.schoolwithinschool.org

    Reblogged from: occupyedu
  9. The difficulty of always feeling that you ought to be doing something is that you tend to undervalue the times when you’re apparently doing nothing, and those are very important times. It’s the equivalent of the dream time, in your daily life, times when things get sorted out and reshuffled. If you’re constantly awake work-wise you don’t allow that to happen. One of the reasons I have to take distinct breaks when I work is to allow the momentum of a particular direction to run down, so that another one can establish itself.

    - Brian Eno, cited by Eric Tamm in Brian Eno: His Music and The Vertical Sound Of Color

    I try to take walks everyday, to let the world wash over me and wipe out work thoughts for a while.

    (via stoweboyd)

    If we think about this in terms of education…. then we have to totally rethink how we go about structuring the day.

    Reblogged from: notational
  10. (via TEDxRedmond 2010 | TEDxRedmond)

    Priya Ganesan on killing Creativity in Schools:

Adventures in Learning

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