Education Stories

Stories



College Students: Your School Is Pimping You Out to a Bank


Why are banks so enthusiastic about marketing their products to college students? Because college students, like most young people, don’t know shit about shit.

gawker.com · Tweet this story



Banks Could Return a Favor to Governments


State and local governments looking to refinance bonds are stuck in Wall Street swap deals with high interest rates — so why not save some public money?

nytimes.com · Tweet this story



Do Not Accept the New Normal
Since No Child Left Behind began its reign of error a decade ago, the American public has slowly but surely changed its understanding and expectations of schools. We have come to think that every s…
dianeravitch.net · Tweet this story
    



Challenging Eli Broad’s school memories


Billionaire Eli Broad wrote a piece in Education week writing about the great public school he attended decades ago and how unfortunate schools today aren’t like they used to be. Broad’s memory is…

washingtonpost.com · Tweet this story
   



Not Grading is Awful
Cross posted from my own blog; Blogging Through the Fourth Dimension. I am just going to admit it; not grading sucks! Not grading means I cannot assign an average, translate it into a grade and …
coopcatalyst.wordpress.com

Asana: the modern way to work together (by AsanaTeam)

This looks amazing. I could see it being used in classrooms and in schools. Along with being useful for the Occupy Movement and other social justice work!

(via MAY DAY of Action for Education! #OccupyEDU « Cooperative Catalyst)
 Please Join us at Occupy Education on Tumblr, Facebook and Twitter!
Add I occupy education or I march for education…. on your status and keep them up today.
Contact your School Board, your Congress person, your local DOE, email Arne Duncan, or others and tell/share with them your vision of education transformation.
Bring up education at your workplace, or school, or class, or any place your gather today.
As we stand up to rally on the steps of city hall or at the Department of Education, or at school board meetings or state capitals, let us rally for a Transformed education, for a positive vision of learning, for education and learning that matters.
Let’s use our energy and our coming together to OPT IN to what we want our education to look like, and start to collectively move both locally and nationally towards these visions.
What is your positive vision for a transformed education?

(via MAY DAY of Action for Education! #OccupyEDU « Cooperative Catalyst)

  •  Please Join us at Occupy Education on Tumblr, Facebook and Twitter!
  • Add I occupy education or I march for education…. on your status and keep them up today.
  • Contact your School Board, your Congress person, your local DOE, email Arne Duncan, or others and tell/share with them your vision of education transformation.
  • Bring up education at your workplace, or school, or class, or any place your gather today.

As we stand up to rally on the steps of city hall or at the Department of Education, or at school board meetings or state capitals, let us rally for a Transformed education, for a positive vision of learning, for education and learning that matters.

Let’s use our energy and our coming together to OPT IN to what we want our education to look like, and start to collectively move both locally and nationally towards these visions.

What is your positive vision for a transformed education?

occupyedu:

(via Occupy High: A Protest of Education Funding Cuts (Guest Post by Kalila Bohsali) « Cooperative Catalyst)
Everyone has heard about the Occupy Wall  St. movement and its spread to involve most major cities and small towns  of the U.S. All of this talk about revolution and corporate take down  has stirred the hearts of activists internationally, sparking the hearts  of thousands of people, but what does it have to do with education?  What has the Occupy movement said about our education besides asking for  college to be free? It is time that education joins the occupy movement  and for these institutions we call “school” to  be radically changed.
There is one question we can all ask ourselves; How important is education to you?
It’s something we all experience during  our lives, and your schooling, whether you liked it or not, is something  that has shaped the person you are today. It’s a tool of change and it  has turned into a challenge of endurance. Knowing that you have to wake  up every day and drag yourself to a fluorescent-lighted building to sit  awake through the same monotonous schedule day after day. Go home and  force yourself to do the allotted homework, go to sleep and awake to do  the whole thing over again, five days a week is a mental climb of  perseverance.
School should be a place of  self-realization and learning, not a place of struggle. It should be  self motivated and specifically tailored to fit the students’ needs. It  shouldn’t be boring or impossible to keep up with, it should be  stimulating. It should have classes that you have to push to keep up  with and others that are enjoyable and fun.
With the continual budget cuts imposed by  governors and politicians nationwide, schools are going to have to  continue to cut the programs that really matter to us students: the  classes and electives we enjoy and that help produce our intellectual,  artistic growth; the classes that actually prepare us for our lives.
It’s time that we show the people who  make laws about our education that we take it more seriously. That’s why  we, as high school students, are fed up with the current educational  regime. We’ve decided to take a stand and show that we truly care about  our education and where it takes us.
Occupy High is a movement we have created  to illustrate this. It’s a voluntary Saturday school/ study hall to  show the people in charge of our future, to take our needs and our  voices into consideration. It involves classes taught by experts ranging  from photographer to poets to chefs, that are open to all ages. as well  as a class every week taught by a fellow student of Vista Grande. It  will be place to catch up on school-work. A place where the student can  become the teacher and community can come together to learn from each  other every Saturday.
We are standing up for what we believe is important in our lives and we encourage schools nation-wide to follow suit. Like our page on Facebook and tell us what you feel about our movement. All suggestions are welcome and all support helps, no matter how small.

occupyedu:

(via Occupy High: A Protest of Education Funding Cuts (Guest Post by Kalila Bohsali) « Cooperative Catalyst)

Everyone has heard about the Occupy Wall St. movement and its spread to involve most major cities and small towns of the U.S. All of this talk about revolution and corporate take down has stirred the hearts of activists internationally, sparking the hearts of thousands of people, but what does it have to do with education? What has the Occupy movement said about our education besides asking for college to be free? It is time that education joins the occupy movement and for these institutions we call “school” to  be radically changed.

There is one question we can all ask ourselves; How important is education to you?

It’s something we all experience during our lives, and your schooling, whether you liked it or not, is something that has shaped the person you are today. It’s a tool of change and it has turned into a challenge of endurance. Knowing that you have to wake up every day and drag yourself to a fluorescent-lighted building to sit awake through the same monotonous schedule day after day. Go home and force yourself to do the allotted homework, go to sleep and awake to do the whole thing over again, five days a week is a mental climb of perseverance.

School should be a place of self-realization and learning, not a place of struggle. It should be self motivated and specifically tailored to fit the students’ needs. It shouldn’t be boring or impossible to keep up with, it should be stimulating. It should have classes that you have to push to keep up with and others that are enjoyable and fun.

With the continual budget cuts imposed by governors and politicians nationwide, schools are going to have to continue to cut the programs that really matter to us students: the classes and electives we enjoy and that help produce our intellectual, artistic growth; the classes that actually prepare us for our lives.

It’s time that we show the people who make laws about our education that we take it more seriously. That’s why we, as high school students, are fed up with the current educational regime. We’ve decided to take a stand and show that we truly care about our education and where it takes us.

Occupy High is a movement we have created to illustrate this. It’s a voluntary Saturday school/ study hall to show the people in charge of our future, to take our needs and our voices into consideration. It involves classes taught by experts ranging from photographer to poets to chefs, that are open to all ages. as well as a class every week taught by a fellow student of Vista Grande. It will be place to catch up on school-work. A place where the student can become the teacher and community can come together to learn from each other every Saturday.

We are standing up for what we believe is important in our lives and we encourage schools nation-wide to follow suit. Like our page on Facebook and tell us what you feel about our movement. All suggestions are welcome and all support helps, no matter how small.

  Download

Bosko, “Occupy Until”

"When I used my lifesavings and a bank loan to start building my family dream home, I never dreamed the bank would go out of business… Nonetheless, in the middle of construction, the government seized IndyMac Bank for illegal business practices, stopping my loan and preventing me from building my family home. To make matters worse, another bank acquired Bosko’s loan from IndyMac and illegally threatened to foreclose. Pushed up against the wall, I decided to fight back. Representing myself with no law degree, (though thankfully a college education) I was able to sue the Banks, and through a grueling two-year federal court battle, stop the foreclosure, and force a favorable settlement.

My career has been gaining momentum, on the heels of my recent success as a writer and performer on J. Cole’s #1 Album and worldwide hit “Workout”, and I felt now was the time to add my voice to the Occupy Wall Street Movement with this new song “Occupy Until…”

There is a common misconception that #ows is about taking money from the rich, but it’s not. #Ows is about stopping the theft of our money and property by Wall Street Banks. The 99% includes everyone from those in poverty to those making less than $340k/yr. Walls Street uses its money to control both political parties, helping it funnel trillions of dollars of our money into its hands. Government bailouts went straight to greedy banker’s pockets while they kicked our families out of their homes.

Please support Occupy Wall Street!”

Comment Posted by Carol Black on "Are Teachers Activists?" « via Cooperative Catalyst

hese are such important questions.

If you look at the phenomenon of collaborative “cheating” in school, for example, you’ll see that it represents a child’s choice of the value of loyalty to a friend over compliance with a structure that tries to pit her against her friends in a competition for adult approval. (This value contradiction should be obvious when we hear the old admonishment before a test, “Don’t help your neighbor!”)

This same value placed on loyalty and mutual support is evident in groups of kids who choose to defy all authority, define their own idea of socially desirable (or “cool”) behavior, and hold in some contempt the child who strives to please authority figures. These kids’ bond to one another, their willingness to sink or swim in the world together, is given precedence over the system’s desire to measure them against one another in order to provide them with differential rewards.

The interesting thing is that both the most and the least privileged social classes tend to evidence an emphasis on group bonding and mutual aid that transcends the competition of the school system. The upper classes always take care of their own, and if one of their children does not perform well in school, he can still become President of the United States! Crucially, however, this social code excludes 99% of the population from its vision of group loyalty and support.

Kids in the poorest communities often know that they can’t expect justice from the system, and so they bond to one another in defiance of it. They understand that what the system offers is a chance for 1% of them to escape to join the upper 1% of society, but that 99% will be left behind. Again, this often leads to resentment of the child who takes advantage of the offer to “rise” out of the community.

Instead of insisting on a competitive zero-sum vision of “success” and then judging kids as “dysfunctional’ when they resist it, we could, as you suggest, be taking this evidence of children’s natural loyalty to their friends as a positive social value that can guide us in creating learning opportunities which are not in conflict with it – not to mention a society and an economy which are not in conflict with it.

The opposite social values, however, are structured deep into the system. The first thing that would have to go is grading.

 Posted by Carol Black | December 10, 2011, 12:32 pm
View from the Tower | Globatron.org

Teaching and learning has not changed much at all,
but the tools used to do so have been installed,
upgraded, patched and begun to evolve.
Where Aristotle might use a stick to draw in the sand,
now a teacher draws on a digital blackboard for one hundred grand.

Where face-to-face conversations were once needed,
online chat-rooms are monitored, sold and seated.
Now I can see and hear you talking.
Now I can raise my avatar’s hand to ask Stephen Hawking,
Any question I might think, if he answers I might get a blink.

At the very core of this discussion is the reason for evolving
as the present day model of higher education is dissolving.
Many technology geniuses are college dropouts such as
Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg with a net worth of $17.5 billion.
Facebook changed the world forever.
Facebook and Twitter were necessary to empower
the Arab Spring and Occupy Together.

In Tunisia, one video emerged filmed inside a hospital in the town of Kasserine:
a young man lay dead with his brains spilled clean.
Posted and re-posted hundreds of times on YouTube, Facebook, and elsewhere,
[the video] set off a wave of revulsion across North Africa and the Middle East.
Many thought or stated, You don’t want to see this, it’s horrible, but you must.
You have a moral obligation to look at what is happening, even if in disgust.

At the core of these movements is the reinvention of power structures.
The toppling of dictatorships be it governmental or corporate,
is the driving force behind these movements which were all initiated online.
All along, the price tag of a bachelor’s degree has continued to increase.
Student protests have popped up all over due to extreme tuition hikes.
These peaceful protests have been met by brute force by the police.

They question the value of student loans and the trickery of college recruiters
pulling the unwary into student loans in order to drive profit margins.
Profits never seen by the average faculty or students.
One can see how traditional learning programs might be threatened
by online learning’s rapid and exponential adaptation.
What we are seeing is an evolution of higher education.

A “Mic Check” on the ivory tower, where knowledge has for centuries
been kept from the general public through over-specialization
of research and academic elitism, disconnected from the practical,
to a more populist approach of community driven education.
Programs are being designed with the students’ needs in mind to empower.
Self-efficacy is something almost entirely new and extremely desired.

Now, professors and universities must evolve quickly
to a world that questions the value of the ivory tower,
that questions the structure of its power,
that questions if the tower should have ever existed at all
and if so how should it be rebuilt before it falls.

occupyedu:

Whether I shall be the hero of my school life, or whether that station will be held by anyone else I cannot tell. All I can say is I am Devoted and Dedicated to my education. That is WHY I OCCUPY!

occupyedu:

Whether I shall be the hero of my school life, or whether that station will be held by anyone else I cannot tell. All I can say is I am Devoted and Dedicated to my education. That is WHY I OCCUPY!

Occupy Portland - Enough is Enough (by OccupyPDX)

"Debt. Every working class American knows what that means. It follows us everywhere we go.
Americans average $7,800 of debt per person, and the numbers keep going up.
But as our debt increases, our jobs and wages decrease.
And when our jobs and wages decrease, Our debt increases.
The 1% ers have shown us over and over again that for them too much is never enough. Now the 99%ers are saying:Enough Is Enough.”
Please vote for my Occupy design poster!
http://occupydesign.maker.good.is/projects/itswe

Please vote for my Occupy design poster!

http://occupydesign.maker.good.is/projects/itswe

I  would like to ask everyone to join us in some way today in solidarity with Occupy UC Davis !
 please, submit a photo of yourself, sharing how and why you Occupy  Education! 
During the school hours today, Leave I Occupy education….  as your  message on your wall, on twitter, or tumblr with at least one vision of a  transformed education system. Use the hashtag #occupyedu 
Do something positive to help transform education and be public about it!
Start a GA in your classroom, in a public space, in your city, on your block. Talk to your community, family or class about transforming education!

I would like to ask everyone to join us in some way today in solidarity with Occupy UC Davis !

  1.  please, submit a photo of yourself, sharing how and why you Occupy Education!
  2. During the school hours today, Leave I Occupy education…. as your message on your wall, on twitter, or tumblr with at least one vision of a transformed education system. Use the hashtag #occupyedu
  3. Do something positive to help transform education and be public about it!
  4. Start a GA in your classroom, in a public space, in your city, on your block. Talk to your community, family or class about transforming education!


occupyedu:

I occupy education so that all children will one day be healthy, well nourished, are part of a community, and that their gifts are celebrated!
1 in 4 hungry children in New Mexico

occupyedu:

I occupy education so that all children will one day be healthy, well nourished, are part of a community, and that their gifts are celebrated!

1 in 4 hungry children in New Mexico

occupyedu:

I occupy education by running a program that makes it possible for students of all abilities and learning styles to learn about computing and technology, the arts, and more, that supports students in their pursuit of postsecondary education and careers of choice, and that is encouraging other schools to say “you can” to students, instead of “you can’t do that because you are a special education student”.

occupyedu:

I occupy education by running a program that makes it possible for students of all abilities and learning styles to learn about computing and technology, the arts, and more, that supports students in their pursuit of postsecondary education and careers of choice, and that is encouraging other schools to say “you can” to students, instead of “you can’t do that because you are a special education student”.